July 22, 2008

UPDATED SCHEDULE: THE PROGRAM


THE PROGRAM is a new series of video and other media-based art exhibitions opening on five consecutive Saturday evenings beginning July 26, 2008, including more than 50 works by over 40 artists, most of them internationally-recognized. The exhibitions are co-curated by me, Bart Weiss, and Charles Dee Mitchell and presented by the Video Association of Dallas. Except as noted, all exhibitions will be located at Conduit Gallery, Dallas, Texas, and installations and videos will remain available for viewing during the remainder of the week through noon Thurs. during Conduit's regular hours (Tues. - Sat., 10am - 5pm).

Reserved seating is available for Video Association supporters at the Kilobyter ($100) level and above; for more information about reserved seating, sponsorship opportunities, and membership, please e-mail ac(a)videofest.org. Admission is otherwise free, subject to availability, with seating on a first-come, first-served basis. Donations to the Video Association are greatly appreciated. All programs are subject to change.


Parental discretion is advised (L, N, S, V).

Where else can you find
this concentration of exciting video art and other media-based art? Plus, parties.
Additional comments on Matthew Barney's Drawing Restraint 13 and Ryan Trecartin's A Family Finds Entertainment here. 

NOTE: Because of the exigencies of installing tech stuff for a mostly-new exhibition each week, the pieces shown at each week's opening will remain available for viewing at Conduit Gallery during normal gallery hours (Tues.-Sat. 10-5) only through noon the following Thursday (so we can begin installing the next week's work).

WEEK ONE

SATURDAY, JULY 26

Exhibition Opening, Conduit Gallery

5:00 – 8:00 PM: RECEPTION WITH INSTALLATIONS:

1. Drawing Restraint 13 by Matthew Barney (and b.t.w., all of M. Barney's websites are really helpful), 27:45 min. (2006). Barney as General Douglas MacArthur in a scene that refers both to MacArthur's infamous WWII landing on the Philippines and the Japanese surrender. (See curator's comments here.) Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery.

2. RMB City – A SecondLife City Planning by China Tracy by Cao Fei, 6:08 min. (2007). A promotional demo trailer for the artist's "China-like" virtual real estate project, where development rights are now on sale within the multiplayer online virtual reality game, Second Life ("RMB" is a name for the Chinese currency). (CS) Commissioned by Serpentine Gallery; courtesy of Lombard-Freid Projects.

3. Online access to RMB City-related web pages.

4. Torcito Project by Marcin Ramocki (2005). The artist uses re-purposed Mac software to transform a gallery of cel phone portraits into sonic bitmap scores which are now "played." (CS) Courtesy of the artist.

5. Compilation: End Notes by Tom Moody (with jimpunk), ca. 2:30 min. (2006); New Monuments by Tom Moody, ca. 1:40 min. (2008); and Hoedown by Tom Moody, ca. 1:30 min. (2007). Courtesy of the artists.

6. The Arrangement of Two Opposites While their Maximum Contact is Under Generation by Yves Netzhammer, 27:36 min. (2005). Evocative 3-D animations by an artist exhibited in the most recent Venice Biennial. (CS) Courtesy of Galerie Anita Beckers.

(Still from The Arrangement of Two Opposites While their Maximum Contact is Under Generation by Yves Netzhammer.)

5:30 PM: ART TALK by Carolyn Sortor on Drawing Restraint 13, Conduit Gallery.

8:00 PM: LIVE PERFORMANCE by Treewave. UPDATE: In the past, Paul Slocum's band has been known for his original composition "chiptunes" (8- and 16-bit music) using Commodore 64's, an old PC FM sound card (OPL3), a Compaq Portable II, an Epson LQ500 dot-matrix printer, and an Atari 2600, with projected video created with original and hacked Atari code. But at this performance, Paul played a complex mash-up incorporating some of the music he's made before and a lot of other cool stuff.

12:00 AM: LIVE PERFORMANCE / AFTER-PARTY: Apples in Stereo perform at Sons of Hermann Hall, corner of Elm and Exposition (map; separate admission fee to Sons, but {thanks, Sons!} a limited number of discount coupons will be available at the Conduit Gallery opening).

WEEK TWO

SATURDAY, AUGUST 2

Exhibition Opening, Conduit Gallery

7:00 – 7:30 PM: RECEPTION WITH INSTALLATIONS:

1. Drawing Restraint 13 by Matthew Barney (and b.t.w., all of M. Barney's websites are really helpful), 27:45 min. (2006). Barney as General Douglas MacArthur in a scene that refers both to MacArthur's infamous WWII landing on the Philippines and the Japanese surrender. (See curator's comments here.) Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery.

2. Accidental Blue Screen and Lord of the Flies by John Michael Boling and Javier Morales (see also http://www.gooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooogle.com), (2006). The artist repurposes material from corporate and amateur sources to yield meaningful surprises. (CS) Courtesy of the artist.

3. cover this YouTube in blood, Bricks video, and 9 Short Music Videos by Guthrie Lonergan. So many good reasons for this. (CS) Courtesy of the artist.

4. Shiftspace Demo (ShiftSpace was initiated in 2007 by Mushon Zer-Aviv and Dan Phiffer). ShiftSpace is an open source layer "above" the web that allows community members to comment or build overlays on any web page, including adding postit-like notes, image swaps, source code modifications, and trails to other URLs, enabling artists, activists, educators, hobbyists, and others to create online contexts on top of existing websites. (CS)
5. Shiftspace Interactive. Try it out.

6. The Arrangement of Two Opposites While their Maximum Contact is Under Generation by Yves Netzhammer, 27:36 min. (2005). Evocative 3-D animations by an artist exhibited in the most recent Venice Biennial. (CS) Courtesy of Galerie Anita Beckers.

7. Sitcoms by Matt Marello, total ca. 15:00 min. (1996), with the artist as various philosophers displaced into t.v. times: The Beverly Hillbillies featuring Jean Paul Sartre (decontextualized Sartre always cracks me up); Bewitched with Georg Hegel; Gilligan's Island with Rene Descartes; Hogan's Heroes with Friedrich Nietsche; and The Munsters with Immanuel Kant. Courtesy of the artist.

7:30 PM: SEATED SCREENINGS:

1. Bend by Liz Magic Laser and Felicia Garcia-Rivera, 7 min. (2008). Five young men in a motorcycle club follow a series of instructions from an off-camera woman. (CS) Courtesy of the artists.

2. Meals on Wheels by Jon Pylypchuk, 4:24 min. (2006). The spirit of volunteerism is alive but not so well in this possibly all-too-realistic narrative. (CDM) Courtesy of Friedrich Petzel Gallery.

3. Rien du Tout by Clemens von Wedemeyer and Maya Schweizer, 30 min. (2006). An open casting call has drawn dozens of young people to audition for a Medieval epic, a film to be directed by one of the most perfectly odious characters ever created. One not so lucky kid is chosen while the others are told wait outside in the cold and the rain. The peasants begin to revolt. (CDM) Courtesy of Galerie Jocelyn Wolff.

4. Residential Erection by Kenneth Tin-Kin Hung, 4:34 min. (2008). A cut and paste animated recap of the campaigns so far. Disheartening news: it could also be a glimpse into the future. (CDM) Courtesy of Postmasters gallery.

5. Once Removed on My Mothers Side** by Nathalie Djurberg, 5:31 min. (2008). A young woman ministers to an obese elder. (CS) Courtesy of Zach Feuer Gallery.

6. Host by Kristin Lucas, 7:36 min. (1997). Lucas has said, " . . . I participate in an on-line therapy session directed by the system operator of a streetside multi-media kiosk. . . . [the session becomes] an amalgamation of daytime television and tabloid, wherein the surveillance camera becomes the eye of the media." Courtesy of the artist.

7. Nude Beach by Jon Pylypchuk, 4:59 min. (2006). “I thought this was a public beach.” Famous last words. (CDM) Courtesy of Friedrich Petzel Gallery.

8. Dumstrut** by Nathalie Djurberg, 4.12 min. (2006). A boy torments a cat, testing its and his own limits. (CS) Courtesy of Zach Feuer Gallery.

9. The Human Opera XXX by Meiro Koizumi, 17 min. (2007). The artist subjects a man to an "experiment" in which he is to "share a tragic story of his life in front of a video camera" in return for "a monetary payment"; brilliant and profoundly disturbing. (CS) Courtesy of Nicole Klagsbrun gallery.

(Photo from The Human Opera XXX by Meiro Koizumi, courtesy Nicole Klagsbrun gallery.)

**NOTE: During the remainder of the week, Once Removed on My Mother's Side will be available for viewing only on Tuesday and Thursday, and Dumstrut will be available for viewing only on Wednesday and Friday.

9:00 PM: AFTER-PARTY: Bolsa, 614 W. Davis St. (Just west of the Bishop Arts District, at Cedar Hill; map)

TUESDAY, AUGUST 5

7:00 PM: SEATED SCREENINGS at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth: (Please see descriptions under Saturday, August 2 Seated Screenings.)

WEEK THREE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 9

Exhibition Opening, Conduit Gallery

6:30 – 7:30 PM: RECEPTION WITH INSTALLATIONS:


1. Drawing Restraint 13 by Matthew Barney (and b.t.w., all of M. Barney's websites are really helpful), 27:45 min. (2006). Barney as General Douglas MacArthur in a scene that refers both to MacArthur's infamous WWII landing on the Philippines and the Japanese surrender. (See curator's comments here.) Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery.

2. A Family Finds Entertainment by Ryan Trecartin, 41:12 min. (2004). The artist's entourage and himself in multiple roles play media-immersed characters in a story about Skippy's adventures in "coming out." [See curator's comments here.] Courtesy of Elizabeth Dee gallery.

3. RMB City – A SecondLife City Planning by China Tracy by Cao Fei, 6:08 min. (2007). A promotional demo trailer for the artist's "China-like" real estate project, where development rights are now on sale, within the multiplayer online virtual reality game, Second Life ("RMB" is a name for the Chinese currency). (CS) Commissioned by Serpentine Gallery; courtesy of Lombard-Freid Projects.4. Triptych TV, compilation from a vlog by jimpunk, Mr. Tamale, and Rick Silva a.k.a. Abe Linkoln, --- min. (2008). Courtesy of the artists.

5. Shiftspace Demo. ShiftSpace is an open source layer "above" the web that allows community members to comment or build overlays on any web page, including adding postit-like notes, image swaps, source code modifications, and trails to other URLs, enabling artists, activists, educators, hobbyists, and others to create online contexts on top of existing websites. (CS) Initiated (in 2007?) by Mushon Zer-Aviv and Dan Phiffer.

6. Shiftspace Interactive. Try it out.

7. Battleship Potemkin Dance Edit (120 BPM) by Michael Bell-Smith (with the assistance of Jeff Sission), 12:29 (2007). The artist "separated the film into its constituent shots and time stretched them one by one to the exact same length [, and] then replaced the soundtrack with a one-second dance loop synced to the cuts", replacing the original editing structure of the revolutionary narrative, which has been called seminal in its use of montage, with the "dumb, visceral, metric montage favored by dance visuals and music videos". Courtesy of the artist and EAI.

(Still from Battleship Potemkin Dance Edit (120 BPM) by Michael Bell-Smith (with the assistance of Jeff Sission), courtesy of the artist.)

7:30 PM: SEATED SCREENINGS:

1. Studies in Transfalumination by Peter Rose, 5:30 min. (2008). Courtesy of the artist.

2. May I Help You by Andrea Fraser, 19:47 min. (1991). A gallerist extols a series of black paintings by Allan McCollum, oddly and at great length. (CS) Courtesy of Friedrich Petzel Gallery.

3. Ride to da' Club by Kalup Linzy, 5:06 min. (2002). Linzy plays the female lead and many of the voices in this cheerfully profane conference call all aimed at getting to the club. Now, why is it no one wants to ride with Big Dick Johnny? (CDM) Courtesy of Taxter Spengemann gallery.

4. Whispering Pines 8 by Shana Moulton, 7:36 min. (2006). One of a series of episodes in which the artist's naive, trusting alter ego, Cynthia, resorts to various 80's diversions in a continuing struggle against existential depression. (CS) Courtesy of Country Club Gallery.

(Still from Whispering Pines 8 by Shana Moulton, courtesy Country Club gallery.)

5. Tommy-Chat Just E-Mailed Me by Ryan Trecartin, 7:15 min. (2004). Described by the artist as a "narrative video short that takes place inside and outside of an e-mail," the artist's friends and himself in multiple roles play Pam, a lesbian librarian with a screaming baby in an ultra-modern hotel; Tammy and Beth, in an apartment filled with installation art; and Tommy, in a secluded lake house. Courtesy of Elizabeth Dee gallery.

6. Artist Trilogy by Matt Marello, 13 min. (2001-2002). Mr. Marello plays the lead in three classic – well, maybe not so classic – films about artists as victims, killers, and charlatans. Let’s see, did he leave anything out? Oh, yes, insatiable sex fiend. (CDM) Courtesy of the artist.

7. five more minutes by Dena DeCola and Karin E. Wandner, 17:23 min. (2005). The artists enact intimate moments between a "mother" and "child," to poignant yet peculiar effect. (CS) Courtesy of the Video Data Bank.

(Photo from five more minutes by Dena DeCola and Karin E. Wandner, courtesy of Video Data Bank.)

8. Melody Set Me Free by Kalup Linzy, 14:06 min. (2007). The talented Mr. Linzy, in impeccable Whitney Houston drag, overcomes a mother's negativity and competitors' backstage backstabbing to find true love and a chance at stardom. You go, girl! (CDM) Courtesy of Taxter Spengemann gallery.

(Photo from Melody Set Me Free by Kalup Linzy, courtesy Taxter Spengemann gallery.)

9. The Code by Anthony Goicolea, 1:18 min. (2007). Courtesy of Postmasters gallery.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 10

1:30 PM: PANEL DISCUSSION at the Dallas Museum of Art, Center for Creative Connections (f.k.a. the Orientation Theater), featuring the three co-curators plus media-based artist/gallerist
Paul Slocum, with clips from various works and screenings of the following complete pieces:
Still Point by Alfred Guzzetti,14:30 min. (2008). The camera lingers on a series of beautifully-framed scenes.

The Dating Game by John Pylypchuk, 5:19 min. (2006). A send-up of the '60's-70's t.v. show in which the "behind the scenes" isn't very.

Moby Dick by Guy Ben-Ner, 13 min. (2000). The artist and his young daughter enact the entirety of the novel, almost entirely in their kitchen.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 12

7:00 PM: SEATED SCREENING at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth: An Estranged Paradise by Yang Fudong, 76 min. (1997/2002). This is Fudong’s first, near feature-length film, shot six years before he began work on his multi-part masterpiece, Seven Intellectuals in Bamboo Forest (2003 – 2006). Fudong speaks for a generation of young Chinese intellectuals caught at “a moment when we have to negotiate our past while inventing our future.” The protagonist of Paradise is Zuzhi, a young man who drifts through a rapidly modernizing Shanghai, suffering from an undefined illness that seems to come on with the rainy season. Although he has two girlfriends he admits he is happiest when visiting with doctors or entertaining his parents on their trips in from the countryside. Yang opens his film with a lesson in Chinese landscape painting, in which what is left out can be the most significant elements. (CDM) Courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery.

WEEK FOUR
SATURDAY, AUGUST 16
Exhibition Opening, Conduit Gallery

6:00 PM: SPECIAL PRESENTATION of An Estranged Paradise by Yang Fudong, 76 min. (1997/2002). (Please see description under Tuesday, August 12.).

7:00 – 7:30 PM: RECEPTION WITH INSTALLATIONS:
1. A Family Finds Entertainment by Ryan Trecartin, 41:12 min. (2004). The artist's entourage and himself in multiple roles play media-immersed characters in a story about Skippy's adventures in "coming out." [See curator's comments here.] Courtesy of Elizabeth Dee gallery.

2. Who’s Listening 1 by Yu-Chin Tseng, 7:55 min. (2003-04). A series of children are surprised. (CS) Courtesy of the artist.
3. RMB City – A SecondLife City Planning by China Tracy by Cao Fei, 6:08 min. (2007). A promotional demo trailer for the artist's "China-like" real estate project, where development rights are now on sale, within the multiplayer online virtual reality game, Second Life ("RMB" is a name for the Chinese currency). (CS) Commissioned by Serpentine Gallery; courtesy of Lombard-Freid Projects.

4.
Triptych TV, compilation from a vlog by jimpunk, Mr. Tamale, and Rick Silva a.k.a. Abe Linkoln, --- min. (2008). Courtesy of the artists.

5. Second Life Dumpster by eteam in collaboration with Relder Waco, Whooter Walworth, Dunn Bing, and others, 45 min. (2008). The artists are creating a dumpster within the multiplayer online virtual reality game, Second Life, to collect virtual trash such as unmarketable virtual merchandise and superseded avatar body parts. (CS) Courtesy of the artists.

6. Max Payne Cheats Only 1 by JODI, 23 min. (2004). A video game said to have influenced John Woo is deconstructed. (CS) Courtesy of And/Or Gallery.
7. Battleship Potemkin Dance Edit (120 BPM) by Michael Bell-Smith (with the assistance of Jeff Sission), 12:29 (2007). The artist "separated the film into its constituent shots and time stretched them one by one to the exact same length [, and] then replaced the soundtrack with a one-second dance loop synced to the cuts", replacing the original editing structure of the revolutionary narrative, which has been called seminal in its use of montage, with the "dumb, visceral, metric montage favored by dance visuals and music videos". Courtesy of the artist.

7:30 PM: SEATED SCREENINGS:

1. Timbuktu** by Nathalie Djurberg, 4:40 min. (2007). A bureaucrat loses in a contest among three different kinds of power. (CS) Courtesy of Zach Feuer Gallery.

2. Stealing Beauty by Guy Ben-Ner, 17 min. (2007). Ben-Ner and his family make themselves at home in a furniture store – literally
while discussing the virtues of capitalism. (CS) Courtesy of Postmasters gallery.

(Still from Stealing Beauty by Guy Ben-Ner, courtesy Postmasters gallery.)

3. Hogan's Heroes by Matt Marello, 2:47 min. (1996). Friedrich Nietzsche chats up America’s most lovable POW’s and their charming SS guards. (CDM) Courtesy of the artist.

4. IMirror (A Second Life Documentary Film by China Tracy a.k.a. Cao Fei) by Cao Fei, 28:07 min. (2007). A documentary created by the artist within the multiplayer online virtual reality game, Second Life; this piece was shown at the most recent Venice Biennial. (CS)
Courtesy of Lombard-Freid Projects.

5. Hobbit Love is the Greatest Love by Steve Reinke, 14 min. (2007). The artist explores literal and figurative projections in space and time. (CS)
Courtesy of the Video Data Bank.

6. Gas Zappers by Kenneth Tin-Kin Hung, 5:45 min. (2007). Al Gore as a polar bear wields solar panels against a BBQ'ing Bush. In glorious color and delirious bad taste. “Bring it on!” (CDM) Courtesy of Postmasters gallery.

(Still from Gas Zappers by Kenneth Tin-Kin Hung, courtesy Postmasters gallery.)

7. Snapshot: 6 Months in the Life of a Korean American Male by Valerie Soe, 4:30 min. (2008). Courtesy of the artist.

8. Camels Drink Water** by Nathalie Djurberg, 3:48 min. (2007). Two camels help a parched, differently-abled person. (CS) Courtesy of Zach Feuer Gallery.

9. Anaconda Targets by Dominic Angerame, 10:51 min. (2004). As video games become more and more sophisticated, we admire their realism. Here’s a harsh reminder that realism is based on the real. (CDM) Courtesy of the artist.

10. Aria by Brooke Alfaro, 3:20 min. (2002). A young woman sings La Wally to unusual accompaniment. (CS) Courtesy of the artist.

**NOTE: During the remainder of the week, Timbuktu will be available for viewing only on Tuesday and Thursday, and Camels Drink Water will be available for viewing only on Wednesday and Friday.

9:00 PM: AFTER-PARTY: The Windmill Lounge, 5320 Maple Ave. (between Motor/Medical District and Inwood; map).

WEEK FIVE
SATURDAY, AUGUST 23
Exhibition Opening, Conduit Gallery

7:00 – 7:30 PM: RECEPTION WITH INSTALLATIONS:
1. A Family Finds Entertainment by Ryan Trecartin, 41:12 min. (2004). The artist's entourage and himself in multiple roles play media-immersed characters in a story about Skippy's adventures in "coming out." [See curator's comments here.] Courtesy of Elizabeth Dee gallery.

2. Who’s Listening 1 by Yu-Chin Tseng, 7:55 min. (2003-04). A series of children are surprised. (CS) Courtesy of the artist.
3. RMB City – A SecondLife City Planning by China Tracy by Cao Fei, 6:08 min. (2007). A promotional demo trailer for the artist's "China-like" real estate project, where development rights are now on sale, within the multiplayer online virtual reality game, Second Life ("RMB" is a name for the Chinese currency). (CS) Commissioned by Serpentine Gallery; courtesy of Lombard-Freid Projects.4. Triptych TV, compilation from a vlog by jimpunk, Mr. Tamale, and Rick Silva a.k.a. Abe Linkoln, --- min. (2008). Courtesy of the artists.

5. Second Life Dumpster by eteam, 45 min.(2008). The artists are creating a dumpster within the multiplayer online virtual reality game, Second Life, to collect virtual trash such as unmarketable virtual merchandise and superseded avatar body parts. (CS) Courtesy of the artists.
6. Max Payne Cheats Only 1 by JODI, 23 min. (2004). A video game said to have influenced John Woo is deconstructed. (CS) Courtesy of And/Or Gallery.

7. Hand Flurry by Joel Holmberg, 1:00 min. (2008). Courtesy of the artist.

7:30 PM: SEATED SCREENINGS:1. The Guest by John Bock, 11:25 min. (2004). A rabbit. An apartment. A man with lettuce tied to his feet. (CDM) Courtesy of the artist.

2. Palms by John Bock, 59:14 min. (2007). In the films of John Bock, mad scientists and crazed farm workers conduct visceral experiments in settings that range from pastoral landscapes to baroque palaces. In Palms, his first American-produced film, he takes on the world of Sunshine Noir. Two European killers arrive at LAX, rent a Lincoln convertible, and set off on a journey that is part hit job, part road trip, and possibly a spiritual quest. Expect blood, funny props, music, classics of modern architecture, and dialog that doesn’t really get scary until it begins to just maybe make sense. (CDM) Courtesy of Anton Kern gallery.

(Photo from Palms by John Bock, courtesy Anton Kern gallery.)

3. Anniversary Waltz by David Adamo, 3:58 min. (2007). The party is over. The guests have all gone home. The artist dances alone. (CDM) Courtesy of Fruit and Flower Deli.

9:00 PM: AFTER-PARTY: Absinthe Lounge, 1409 S. Lamar St., #008 (at Southside on Lamar; map)

1 comment:

  1. My lord, what a labor of love!! Good luck!!! XO,
    Amy

    ReplyDelete